Leaders Who Manage Triggers

Call it a trigger, a pet peeve or that thing that grinds your gears…we all have them. Some unique, some recurring, there are those instances that set off a nearly automatic and charged response which typically ends poorly. Conventional wisdom suggests that difficult thoughts and feelings have no place at work, though. Champ up, stuff it down and put on your cheerful (or at least stoic) face and move on. 

An Underutilized Leadership Discipline

Achievement, growth and progress come with a funny by-product. We adapt.  What was once “out there” and seemingly unreachable, becomes normal, expected, routine. This happens because in our minds there are multiple realities simultaneously occurring with the brain bouncing back and forth between the facts about where it is today and the fantasy of where it believes it should be. This creates a void between the two points and in that void is the pursuit, the hunt, the drive to achieve, grow and progress toward something different.

Leadership Practice of Reflection

In The Art of Exceptional Living”, speaker and author Jim Rohn emphasizes the value of a key leadership habit: reflection. He states that high achievers routinely reserve time to take stock of what happened. It may be a few minutes at the end of the day or week, a few hours at the end of the month or quarter, and/or a day or two at the end of the year. Whatever the discipline, the impact is the same – clarity. Clarity comes from celebrating the wins, identifying important lessons learned and recalibrating priorities as needed. 

What does it mean to have a leader mindset?

In their recent book, Everyone Deserves a Great Manager”, authors Scott Miller, Todd Davis and Victoria Roos Olsson suggest that part of your job as a leader is to routinely assess your paradigms (or mindsets) for accuracy. Mindsets about our team or ourselves as leaders that do not reflect reality can limit how we perform and the extent to which we empower our teams.  

Leadership and Self-Awareness

Daniel Goleman, an authority on emotional intelligence in the workplace, notes that “no matter what leaders set out to do—whether it’s creating a strategy or mobilizing teams to action—their success depends on how they do it. Even if they get everything else just right, if leaders fail in this primal task of driving emotions in the right direction, nothing they do will work as well as it could or should.”

Leaders Who Show Extreme Ownership

In his book, “Extreme Ownership”, leadership consultant and retired Navy SEAL officer, Jocko Willink shares the essence of the work in one overarching statement: “The book derives its title from the underlying principle — the mind-set — that provides the foundation for all the rest: Extreme Ownership. Leaders must own everything in their world. There is no one else to blame.” Embracing this principle can be simultaneously empowering and daunting. Should a leader take full ownership for a mistake even when the team member is clearly and fully at fault? It depends on what your goal is. 

Read more “Leaders Who Show Extreme Ownership”